Information
ilwinsgarden:

ccbytheseashore:

xchrononautx:

fuckyeahviralpics:

It’s never too late to learn the right way to do things: button sewing technique via imgur → more…

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE

I feel like I just reblog this every time it is on my dash, with hope that one day I will stop being such a goof about sewing buttons.

You mean someone don’t do it like this?

ilwinsgarden:

ccbytheseashore:

xchrononautx:

fuckyeahviralpics:

It’s never too late to learn the right way to do things: button sewing technique via imgurmore…

WHERE HAVE YOU BEEN ALL MY LIFE

I feel like I just reblog this every time it is on my dash, with hope that one day I will stop being such a goof about sewing buttons.

You mean someone don’t do it like this?

How to make arm wraps without actually using arm wraps!

creativerash:

So recently as some of you may know I had to figure out how to make these green arm wraps in the picture below
image

I wanted them to be one piece so that they wouldn’t have to be adjusted throughout the day if parts decided to slip, especially since the original plan was to tuck the shirt into them. I searched the internet for a while but couldn’t find anything too helpful so I decided to make it up as I went along and took pictures so I could share in the event it worked. (It did)
This process should work for just about any wrap you want to create for instance things like this as well…

image

image

image

There isn’t much to it but I took a lot of pictures, so here we go.
First things first, you’ll want to wrap what ever part of your body you are making the wrap for in plastic wrap (we use this method frequently). Mine was just the forearm so it looked like this

image

Then wrap it again in tape, masking tape works nicely.
image

After that you want to draw where the seam is going to be and cut along it like so
image

image

Once you have the piece disconnected from your body you want to flatten it, I placed my piece under a pile of binders for about a day
image

While you are waiting you can get started on the strips of fabric you’ll be using later. Figure out how thick you want the bands to look and measure them out of the fabric you are using
image

Don”t forget to add a seam allowance, like I did. The length of the strips doesn’t really matter right now, as long as it’s long enough to wrap around your arm once you should be fine. I cut out 12 to be on the safe side. You should have something like this.

image

Once I had the strips cut out I folded the seam allowance over on all of them, this made it easier later when I attached them to the main piece.

image

You can then put the strips to the side and go back to the main pattern piece. For the forearm it should look something like this once flattened

image

You’ll want to clean up the edges with the plastic hanging off and then transfer the pattern piece onto a piece of paper, again making sure to add seam allowance around the edges.
image

Once you’ve traced around the whole thing you can cut it out and that will be the pattern for the main piece of your arm wrap. Use the pattern to cut out a piece in the fabric you are using and together with your straps your pieces should look like this.
image

You want to sew on the strips one at a time, starting from one end then making your way to the other. I started from the bottom. Pin the strip onto the main piece along the hem you already created like this
image

You then want to sew the strip down along the top and bottom edge. There will be fabric hanging off from the strip, you want your seam to stay in between the edges of the main piece. After that is sewn on cut off any extra material from the strip.
image

It should look something like this
image

Continue with the other strips. I attached mine diagonally for the most part. When I was done attaching my strips (I only used 6) this is what I had.
image

Sew your side seams together.
image

And then hem the top and bottom.
image

Viola! You should have an arm (body) wrap that you won’t have to wrap!

image

(I didn’t hem the top because I attached it directly to the shirt)
Also it should be noted stretch material should probably be used. 
Hope it helps someone! :)

meltingchocolat:

just posted for future reference

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimage

imageimageimageimage
imageimageimageimage
imageimage

imageimageimageimageimageimageimageimageimage

costumecommunityservice:

[full size]
This is perhaps approaching graduate level information as far as digital costuming is concerned, but I think that the more fidelity professional game artists have access to, the more mindful the details ought to be. This is especially true in the case of low-tech/medieval/pre-industrial fantasy where everything in the world is handmade; these little details are really crucial to selling that look.

costumecommunityservice:

[full size]

This is perhaps approaching graduate level information as far as digital costuming is concerned, but I think that the more fidelity professional game artists have access to, the more mindful the details ought to be. This is especially true in the case of low-tech/medieval/pre-industrial fantasy where everything in the world is handmade; these little details are really crucial to selling that look.

cosplaytutorial:

Tip Tuesday #82

Use a soldering iron to cut intricate designs into thermoplastics. Soldering irons can also cut intricate designs into plastic-based (synthetic) fabrics, leaving an edge that won’t fray. You can also add battle damage to EVA foam with a soldering iron. 

Keep in mind that some materials may release gases when burned. Do this in a well ventilated area!

tmirai:

Foam and Worbla armour MEGA TUTORIAL

Tutorial by AmenoKitarou

Super duper awesome and helpful! I am totally going to try this out for my Garrosh cosplay.

be-blackstar:

thenobleflesh:

listoflifehacks:

If you like this list of life hacks, follow ListOfLifeHacks for more like it!

LEARN SISTERS AND BROTHERS. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER

they said “bra wearer” 

respect, lifehacks. 

verlidaine:

alright alright alright alright 

siffy:

Just bringing over a tip I posted on Facebook that I thought might helpful to cosplay folks.
Soooo a lot of times the metal buckles you grab off the shelf be it for armor or straps or jackets are going to be a shiny plated nickel. It’s possible to find an antique nickel finish, but it’s rarer, especially if you don’t have a specialty store like Tandy Leather near you. For me, Tandy didn’t have the antique finish in the buckles I liked best, so I picked up the shiny ones and tried to figure out a way to age them for Fili.After some internet digging I found a few different methods for darkening/aging the metal, but I didn’t really have the time or tools for them. Then I randomly found this product and decided, why not. The stuff is called… Nickel Ager. And hallelujah, it does exactly what it says. In the pic above, you can see how shiny my buckles were in the top picture. The middle picture was after letting them sit in the solution of Nickel Ager for TWO MINUTES and then letting them dry overnight. After that I buffed them with steel wool, and the result is the bottom right buckle. Bottom left is before being buffed. The result is beautiful, and half a bottle of the smallest bottle covered 6 buckles and a handful of studs and probably would have gone further if I was being careful (aka not lazy).So yeah, if you have bright shiny nickel plated buckles and need them to have a natural aged look, THIS.

siffy:

Just bringing over a tip I posted on Facebook that I thought might helpful to cosplay folks.

Soooo a lot of times the metal buckles you grab off the shelf be it for armor or straps or jackets are going to be a shiny plated nickel. It’s possible to find an antique nickel finish, but it’s rarer, especially if you don’t have a specialty store like Tandy Leather near you. For me, Tandy didn’t have the antique finish in the buckles I liked best, so I picked up the shiny ones and tried to figure out a way to age them for Fili.

After some internet digging I found a few different methods for darkening/aging the metal, but I didn’t really have the time or tools for them. Then I randomly found this product and decided, why not. The stuff is called… Nickel Ager. And hallelujah, it does exactly what it says. In the pic above, you can see how shiny my buckles were in the top picture. The middle picture was after letting them sit in the solution of Nickel Ager for TWO MINUTES and then letting them dry overnight. After that I buffed them with steel wool, and the result is the bottom right buckle. Bottom left is before being buffed. The result is beautiful, and half a bottle of the smallest bottle covered 6 buckles and a handful of studs and probably would have gone further if I was being careful (aka not lazy).

So yeah, if you have bright shiny nickel plated buckles and need them to have a natural aged look, THIS.

ironicdavestrider:

Binding with ace bandages is dangerous please do not do it and stop depicting art of trans people binding with bandages that is terrible for young trans people to see.